Graciela: Difference between revisions – Wikipedia

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She was summoned to [[New York City]] in 1943 by Mario Bauzá, when Machito was drafted into the army. She joined the orchestra as lead singer until Machito returned in 1944 and from then on the three shared the stage together until their split in 1975. For thirty-two years, they traveled the United States and the rest of the world and performed at the [[Palladium Ballroom]] from 1946 until its closing in 1966. Besides the Palladium, they would perform at the [[Royal Roost]], [[Birdland (jazz club)|Birdland]], the Park Palace, the Corso and the [[Apollo Theater]] on a yearly week-long gig — and many other clubs and theaters in New York. Graciela and the orchestra also performed on a yearly basis in [[Hollywood, Los Angeles|Hollywood]] — specifically at the Crescendo nightclub. Graciela and the band were also a favorite of the disc jockey [[Symphony Sid]] Torin who had them on his weekly program several times a year. They were also the summer headliners in the [[Concord Resort Hotel]], in the [[Catskills Mountains]], for more than twenty years.

She was summoned to [[New York City]] in 1943 by Mario Bauzá, when Machito was drafted into the army. She joined the orchestra as lead singer until Machito returned in 1944 and from then on the three shared the stage together until their split in 1975. For thirty-two years, they traveled the United States and the rest of the world and performed at the [[Palladium Ballroom]] from 1946 until its closing in 1966. Besides the Palladium, they would perform at the [[Royal Roost]], [[Birdland (jazz club)|Birdland]], the Park Palace, the Corso and the [[Apollo Theater]] on a yearly week-long gig — and many other clubs and theaters in New York. Graciela and the orchestra also performed on a yearly basis in [[Hollywood, Los Angeles|Hollywood]] — specifically at the Crescendo nightclub. Graciela and the band were also a favorite of the disc jockey [[Symphony Sid]] Torin who had them on his weekly program several times a year. They were also the summer headliners in the [[Concord Resort Hotel]], in the [[Catskills Mountains]], for more than twenty years.

They recorded albums in which her best-known recordings include “Esta es Graciela”, “Íntimo y Sentimental” and “Esa Soy Yo, Yo Soy Así”.<ref>{{cite web | title=Afro-Cuban singer Perez Grillo dies in NYC at 94 | publisher=The Associated Press | date=April 7, 2010 | url=https://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5i8dG_U6kLeZvmvBts4nuvttHfRtgD9EUJOVO3 | archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20100413083949/https://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5i8dG_U6kLeZvmvBts4nuvttHfRtgD9EUJOVO3 | archive-date=April 13, 2010 | url-status=dead }}</ref> In 2006, she was honored with the Latin Jazz USA Chico O’Farrill Lifetime Achievement Award. When she died in New York in 2010 at the age of 94, she was considered “The First Lady of Latin Jazz.”<ref>{{cite web | title=Graciela Grillo-Perez, The First Lady Of Latin Jazz Passes Away | website= | date= | url=http://www.sofritoforyoursoul.com/graciela-grilloperez-the-first-lady-of-latin-jazz-passes-away/ | archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20190827181250/http://www.sofritoforyoursoul.com/graciela-grilloperez-the-first-lady-of-latin-jazz-passes-away/ | archive-date=August 27, 2019 | url-status=dead }}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |last=Staff |first=T. N. J. |date=2010-05-27 |title=Afro-Latin Jazz: The legacy of Graciela Grillo-Perez |url=https://tnj.com/afro-latin-jazz/ |access-date=2022-11-19 |website=The Network Journal |language=en-US}}</ref>

They recorded albums in which her best-known recordings include “Esta es Graciela”, “Íntimo y Sentimental” and “Esa Soy Yo, Yo Soy Así”.<ref>{{cite web | title=Afro-Cuban singer Perez Grillo dies in NYC at 94 | publisher=The Associated Press | date=April 7, 2010 | url=https://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5i8dG_U6kLeZvmvBts4nuvttHfRtgD9EUJOVO3 | archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20100413083949/https://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5i8dG_U6kLeZvmvBts4nuvttHfRtgD9EUJOVO3 | archive-date=April 13, 2010 | url-status=dead }}</ref> In 2006, she was honored with the Latin Jazz USA Chico O’Farrill Lifetime Achievement Award. When she died in New York in 2010 at the age of 94, she was considered “The First Lady of Latin Jazz.”<ref>{{cite web | title=Graciela Grillo-Perez, The First Lady Of Latin Jazz Passes Away | website= | date=April 8, 2010 | url=http://www.sofritoforyoursoul.com/graciela-grilloperez-the-first-lady-of-latin-jazz-passes-away/ | archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20190827181250/http://www.sofritoforyoursoul.com/graciela-grilloperez-the-first-lady-of-latin-jazz-passes-away/ | archive-date=August 27, 2019 | url-status=dead }}</ref><ref>{{Cite web |last=Staff |first=T. N. J. |date=2010-05-27 |title=Afro-Latin Jazz: The legacy of Graciela Grillo-Perez |url=https://tnj.com/afro-latin-jazz/ |access-date=2022-11-19 |website=The Network Journal |language=en-US}}</ref>

==Death==

==Death==

Latest revision as of 10:16, 26 March 2024
American singer

GracielaMachito and Graciela singingBirth nameGraciela Pérez GutiérrezBorn(1915-08-23)August 23, 1915Jesús María, Havana, CubaDiedApril 7, 2010(2010-04-07) (aged 94)New York CityGenresLatin jazzOccupation(s)SingerYears active1934–2010Musical artist
Felipa Graciela Pérez y Gutiérrez (August 23, 1915 – April 7, 2010),[1] known by the mononym Graciela, was a Cuban singer of Cuban music and Latin jazz.[2]

Biography[edit]
Graciela was born in Havana, Cuba and raised in the Afro-Cuban Jesús María neighborhood.[3] Graciela was the lead vocalist over a period of 10 years in the 1930s and ’40s with Orquesta Anacaona, an all-female ensemble, before leaving Cuba for the United States. She performed around the world, recording and sharing the stage with her adoptive older brother, Frank Grillo (known as Machito), who encouraged her to sing. They played alongside Mario Bauzá (originator of the genre of Afro-Cuban Jazz) in the orchestra Machito and the Afro-Cubans.
She was summoned to New York City in 1943 by Mario Bauzá, when Machito was drafted into the army. She joined the orchestra as lead singer until Machito returned in 1944 and from then on the three shared the stage together until their split in 1975. For thirty-two years, they traveled the United States and the rest of the world and performed at the Palladium Ballroom from 1946 until its closing in 1966. Besides the Palladium, they would perform at the Royal Roost, Birdland, the Park Palace, the Corso and the Apollo Theater on a yearly week-long gig — and many other clubs and theaters in New York. Graciela and the orchestra also performed on a yearly basis in Hollywood — specifically at the Crescendo nightclub. Graciela and the band were also a favorite of the disc jockey Symphony Sid Torin who had them on his weekly program several times a year. They were also the summer headliners in the Concord Resort Hotel, in the Catskills Mountains, for more than twenty years.
They recorded albums in which her best-known recordings include “Esta es Graciela”, “Íntimo y Sentimental” and “Esa Soy Yo, Yo Soy Así”.[4] In 2006, she was honored with the Latin Jazz USA Chico O’Farrill Lifetime Achievement Award. When she died in New York in 2010 at the age of 94, she was considered “The First Lady of Latin Jazz.”[5][6]

Felipa Graciela Pérez y Gutiérrez died at the age of 94 at New York Cornell-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City at 7:58 am, Wednesday, April 7, 2010. She had renal and pulmonary failure.[1] She was cremated as per her wishes.

Discography[edit]
1952 – Arthur Murray mambo – ¿Dónde estabas tú? – Graciela con Machito y su Orquesta Afro-Cubana
1961 – Machito at the Crescendo – Machito & His Famous Orchestra, featuring Graciela
1962 – World’s Greatest Latin Band – Machito & His Famous Orchestra, featuring Graciela
1963 – Esta es Graciela – Graciela con Machito y su Orquesta
1965 – Íntimo y sentimental – Graciela con Machito y su Orquesta
1972 – Eso soy yo, Yo soy así – Graciela
1976 – La Botánica – Graciela y Mario
1999 – Sí sí no no – Graciela y Mike Young
2000 – Cubop City – Graciela con Machito and his Afro-Cubans, Howard McGhee, Brew Moore, Flip Phillips
2004 – Inolvidable – Candido & Graciela
References[edit]

^ a b Thedeadrockstarsclub.com Accessed April 2010

^ Los Angeles Times obituary, April 13, 2010; page AA7

^ Jon Lusk (May 21, 2010). “Graciela Perez-Gutierrez: Singer who helped pave the way for the fusion of Latin and jazz”. The Independent.

^ “Afro-Cuban singer Perez Grillo dies in NYC at 94”. The Associated Press. April 7, 2010. Archived from the original on April 13, 2010.

^ “Graciela Grillo-Perez, The First Lady Of Latin Jazz Passes Away”. April 8, 2010. Archived from the original on August 27, 2019.

^ Staff, T. N. J. (May 27, 2010). “Afro-Latin Jazz: The legacy of Graciela Grillo-Perez”. The Network Journal. Retrieved November 19, 2022.

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